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Airmen were honored with awards during the Airman Leadership School Graduation Ceremony May 23, 2019, at Joint Base Charleston, S.C. (Left to right) Senior Airman Steffon Capel, 315th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron, received the Distinguished Graduate award; Senior Airman Christopher Leung, 437th Operations Support Squadron, received the Distinguished Graduate award; Staff Sgt. Ryan Erb, 437th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, received the John L. Levitow award; Staff Sgt. Tenley Long, 628th Public Affairs, received the Commandants award; Senior Airman Shadi Zahed, 628th Force Support Squadron, received the Academic Achievement award and Senior Airman Christian Voytko,16th Airlift Squadron, received the Distinguished Graduate award.
Col. Terrence Adams, 628th Air Base Wing commander, left, and Master Sgt. Calantha Pickel, Airman Leadership School commandant, right, present Staff Sgt. Ryan Erb, 437th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, a plaque for earning the John L. Levitow Award during the Airman Leadership School Graduation ceremony May 23, 2019, at Joint Base Charleston. The Levitow Award is the highest honor awarded to an ALS graduate and is given to the Airman who displays the highest level of leadership qualities during the course. ALS is a five-week course encompassing lessons in the principles of supervision and management, the importance of communication and military professionalism.
Tech. Sgt. Jonathan Ardis, 628th Force Support Squadron readiness NCOIC, prepares a plate for Col. Bobby Degregorio, 315th Mission Support Group commander within the Single Pallet Expeditionary Kitchen, during exercise Palmetto Challenge, May 21, 2019, at Joint National Guard Base McEntire, S.C.
Staff Sgt. Lopaz Curry, an emergency operations center representative assigned to the 628th Air Base Wing, speaks into a mobile radio while in mission oriented protective posture (MOPP) gear during exercise Palmetto Challenge May 22, 2019, at McEntire Air National Guard Base, S.C.
Airmen assigned to the 628th Aerial Port Squadron wench an R-11 refueler onto a C-17 Globemaster III during exercise Palmetto Challenge May 21, 2019, at McEntire Joint National Guard Base, S.C.
Senior Airman Savannah Leslie, an installation entry controller assigned to the 628 Security Forces Squadron, drinks from her canteen during exercise Palmetto Challenge May 21, 2019, at Joint National Guard Base McEntire, S.C.
Staff Sgt. Matthew Guggenbiller, a patrolman assigned to the 628th Security Forces Squadron, helps establish a perimeter during exercise Palmetto Challenge May 21, 2019, at McEntire Air National Guard Base, S.C.
Senior Airman Marianne Frye, an aerial porter assigned to the 437th Aerial Port Squadron, maps out unexploded ordnance locations during a personnel accountability report after a simulated attack during exercise Palmetto Challenge, May 21, 2019, at Joint National Guard Base McEntire, S.C.
John J. Tecklenburg, mayor of Charleston, speaks during the National Safe Boating Week Open House held May 18, 2019, at U.S. Coast Guard Sector Charleston in Charleston, S.C. Tecklenburg stressed the importance of boating safety as well as maintaining acute situational awareness while on the water. The Coast Guard National Safe Boating Week Campaign is an annual week-long event held every May to promote boating safety and to inform the public on proper boating procedures. Federal law mandates that the U.S. Coast Guard establish the National Boating Safety Advisory Council and consult with it on regulations and other major boating safety matters. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Cody R. Miller)
The Charleston Police Department holds a “meet-and-greet” for families to interact with law enforcement working dogs and their handlers, who are often employed in both drug and explosive detection operations, during National Safe Boating Week May 18, 2019, at U.S. Coast Guard Sector Charleston in Charleston, S.C. The U.S. Coast Guard often coordinates with local authorities to augment their mission of maritime law enforcement. The Coast Guard National Safe Boating Week Campaign is an annual week-long event held every May to promote boating safety and to inform the public on proper boating procedures. Federal law mandates that the U.S. Coast Guard establish the National Boating Safety Advisory Council and consult with it on regulations and other major boating safety matters. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Cody R. Miller)
U.S. Coast Guard Sector Charleston hosted a National Safe Boating Week Open House May 18, 2019, in Charleston, S.C. The Coast Guard National Safe Boating Week Campaign is an annual week-long event held every May to promote boating safety and inform the public about proper boating procedures. Federal law mandates that the U.S. Coast Guard establish the National Boating Safety Advisory Council and consult with it on regulations and other major boating safety matters. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Cody R. Miller)
A U.S. Coast Guard aviation survival technician takes part in a rescue demonstration while hanging from a MH-65 Dolphin rescue helicopter during the National Safe Boating Week Open House May 18, 2019, at U.S. Coast Guard Sector Charleston in Charleston, S.C. The Coast Guard National Safe Boating Week Campaign is an annual week-long event held every May to promote boating safety and to inform the public on proper boating procedures. Federal law mandates that the U.S. Coast Guard establish the National Boating Safety Advisory Council and consult with it on regulations and other major boating safety matters. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Cody R. Miller)
Mark Bumala, an inspector working for the Naval Treaty Implementation Program, inspects a munitions crate label during the International Chemical Weapons Convention exercise May 16, 2019, at Naval Weapons Station Charleston, Joint Base Charleston, S.C.  Under the Convention’s “challenge inspection” procedure, State Parties have committed themselves to the principle of “anytime, anywhere” inspections with no right of refusal. The purpose of the exercise is to test the response of base assistance teams should the U.S. receive an international challenge inspection under the Chemical Weapons Convention Treaty. The Chemical Weapons Convention aims to eliminate an entire category of weapons of mass destruction by prohibiting the development, production, acquisition, stockpiling, retention, transfer or use of chemical weapons by States Parties. Exercises like these support the Department of Defense’s priority of reformation and full spectrum readiness in the face of new challenges. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Cody R. Miller)
An inspector working for the Naval Treaty Implementation Program unlocks a munitions bunker during the International Chemical Weapons Convention exercise May 16, 2019, at Naval Weapons Station Charleston, Joint Base Charleston, S.C. The Naval Treaty Implementation Program provides comprehensive arms control treaty support to Navy and Marine Corps commanding officers, program managers, senior leadership and decision-makers. The purpose of the exercise is to test the response of base assistance teams should the U.S. receive an international challenge inspection under the Chemical Weapons Convention Treaty. The Chemical Weapons Convention aims to eliminate an entire category of weapons of mass destruction by prohibiting the development, production, acquisition, stockpiling, retention, transfer or use of chemical weapons by States Parties. Exercises like these support the Department of Defense’s priority of reformation and full spectrum readiness in the face of new challenges. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Cody R. Miller)
Inspectors and their military escorts working with the Defense Threat Reduction Agency and Naval Treaty Implementation Program prepare to inspect munitions bunkers during the International Chemical Weapons Convention exercise May 16, 2019, at Naval Weapons Station Charleston, Joint Base Charleston, S.C. The purpose of the exercise is to test the response of base assistance teams should the U.S. receive an international challenge inspection under the Chemical Weapons Convention Treaty. The Chemical Weapons Convention aims to eliminate an entire category of weapons of mass destruction by prohibiting the development, production, acquisition, stockpiling, retention, transfer or use of chemical weapons by State Parties. Exercises like these support the Department of Defense’s priority of reformation and full spectrum readiness in the face of new challenges. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Cody R. Miller)
Inspectors working with the Defense Threat Reduction Agency and Naval Treaty Implementation Program act as international officials and inspect munitions bunkers during the International Chemical Weapons Convention exercise May 16, 2019, at Naval Weapons Station Charleston, Joint Base Charleston, S.C.  A feature of the Convention is its incorporation of the “challenge inspection,” whereby any State Party in doubt about another State Party’s compliance can request a surprise inspection. The purpose of the exercise is to test the response of base assistance teams should the U.S. receive an international challenge inspection under the Chemical Weapons Convention Treaty. The Chemical Weapons Convention aims to eliminate an entire category of weapons of mass destruction by prohibiting the development, production, acquisition, stockpiling, retention, transfer or use of chemical weapons by States Parties. Exercises like these support the Department of Defense’s priority of reformation and full spectrum readiness in the face of new challenges. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Cody R. Miller)
Inspectors working with the Defense Threat Reduction Agency and Naval Treaty Implementation Program organize various inspection teams to inspect perceived points of interest during the International Chemical Weapons Convention exercise May 15, 2019, at Naval Weapons Station Charleston, Joint Base Charleston, S.C. The Naval Treaty Implementation Program is staffed with civilian personnel with expertise in the planning, organization and execution of Navy and Marine Corps implementation, compliance and verification activities. The purpose of the exercise is to test the response of base assistance teams should the U.S. receive an international challenge inspection under the Chemical Weapons Convention Treaty. The Chemical Weapons Convention aims to eliminate an entire category of weapons of mass destruction by prohibiting the development, production, acquisition, stockpiling, retention, transfer or use of chemical weapons by States Parties. Exercises like these support the Department of Defense’s priority of reformation and full spectrum readiness in the face of new challenges. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Cody R. Miller)
An inspector working for the Naval Treaty Implementation Program uses a map to find potential areas to inspect during the International Chemical Weapons Convention exercise May 16, 2019, at Naval Weapons Station Charleston, Joint Base Charleston, S.C. The Naval Treaty Implementation Program provides comprehensive arms control treaty support to Navy and Marine Corps commanding officers, program managers, senior leadership and decision-makers. The purpose of the exercise is to test the response of base assistance teams should the U.S. receive an international challenge inspection under the Chemical Weapons Convention Treaty. The Chemical Weapons Convention aims to eliminate an entire category of weapons of mass destruction by prohibiting the development, production, acquisition, stockpiling, retention, transfer or use of chemical weapons by States Parties. Exercises like these support the Department of Defense’s priority of reformation and full spectrum readiness in the face of new challenges. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Cody R. Miller)
Alex Jestel (left) and Mac Williams (right), both Naval Treaty Implementation Program compliance inspectors working on the Chemical Weapons Convention exercise, discuss potential locations to be inspected May 15, 2019, at Naval Weapons Station Charleston, Joint Base Charleston, S.C. A feature of the Convention is its incorporation of the “challenge inspection,” whereby any State Party in doubt about another State Party’s compliance can request a surprise inspection. The purpose of the exercise is to test the response of base assistance teams should the U.S. receive an international challenge inspection under the Chemical Weapons Convention Treaty. The Chemical Weapons Convention aims to eliminate an entire category of weapons of mass destruction by prohibiting the development, production, acquisition, stockpiling, retention, transfer or use of chemical weapons by States Parties. Exercises like these support the Department of Defense’s priority of reformation and full spectrum readiness in the face of new challenges. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Cody R. Miller)
May is National Physical Fitness and Sports Month.