NEWS | Sept. 12, 2011

Swipe and go - a new payment method at Weapons Station Galley

By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jennifer Hudson

Joint Base Charleston-Weapon Station's five-star award winning base galley is now accepting all major credit and debit cards to pay for meals. This service provides today's on-the-go Sailor less time waiting in line and more time enjoying a hot meal.

Under the new guidance provided by Commander Navy Installations Command, credit card usage will not only reduce wait times for Sailors, but reduce deposit trips to a bank, man-hours and mistakes commonly made with cash.

"A lot of people don't carry around cash anymore," said Chief Culinary Specialist Eric Combs, JB CHS - WS galley leading chief petty officer. "So adding the convenience of using a credit or debit card just makes it easier for the Sailors here at JBC-WS."

According to Combs, the galley is getting more customers than before it accepted the cards and there is hardly a waiting line. Another benefit is the new payment system allows for quicker deposits.

Commander Navy Installations Command eventually wants all shore-based galleys to become completely cashless and reduce expenses by saving manpower Navy-wide. No transaction fees are passed on to Sailors or the galley program, and no signature or pin is required on transactions less than $25.

Although the galley has only been allowing credit card usage for a short time and still accepts cash from customers, staff members and customers all agree that the added payment method was a much needed improvement for today's Sailor.

"I think the credit card system is great and we are getting more people to come eat here than we did before," said Ship's Serviceman 3rd Class Chris Roberts, cashier.

Electrician's Mate 3rd Class Lauren Long, a student at Naval Nuclear Power Training Command at JBC-WS, often frequented local food chains or packed her lunch because she rarely carries cash.

"I never ate at the galley before because all they accepted was cash," she said. "Being able to use a credit card is a really big relief for me. The food is healthier, the galley is more convenient and I don't have to worry about packing a lunch or spending my money elsewhere."

According to Combs, the galley provides 'more bang for your buck' by providing breakfast, lunch and dinner to its service members.

"Every Sailor who walks through those doors is going to get fast, quality customer service, be greeted with a smile and get a warm meal in their bellies each and every time; and it only costs them $4.25," he concluded. "Who can beat that?"