NEWS | April 24, 2017

JB Charleston recognizes military children

By Airman Joshua R. Maund Joint Base Charleston Public Affairs

Military children can face adversity due to the essential and demanding career path of their parents. Deployments, permanent changes of station, new school and new friends are a few challenges a military child may face.

More than 1.8 million children nationwide have at least one, or both, parents serving in the military.

April has been designated as Month of the Military Child since 1986. Former Secretary of Defense, Casper W. Weinberger, was inspired by the courageousness of children in the military community and implemented the month to honor them.

Events throughout the month are designed to help acknowledge the sacrifice and courage children display while their parents are deployed.

“I believe when a child grows up in a military family it provides them skills to be successful in life,” said Staff Sgt. Breanna Cook, 628th Force Support Squadron shift leader. “The children learn what change is at such a young age they carry that throughout life.”

Breanna Cook is the wife of deployed Senior Airmen Justin Cook, 628th FSS customer support technician. They have one child, Naila, and are expecting another.

“Our children didn't volunteer for this lifestyle, as parents it is important for us to remember that,” said Breanna Cook. “When Naila is having a tough time coping, we talk about what she's feeling and I explain things to her the best way possible to ease her mind.”

Military installations offer a number of ways to integrate and acclimate the ever-changing populous of military children within the community. Joint Base Charleston participated in celebration with a Month of The Military Child parade and Little Heroes Ceremony. Deployments, permanent changes of station, new school and new friends are a few challenges a military child may face.

“While the children’s sacrifices may initially be tough to overcome, they are also opportunities for personal growth, creating a culture of more resilient, independent and socially adapted young men and women,” said Master Sgt. Robert Smith, 628th Force Support Squadron NCO in charge. “It's a balancing act mostly unique to our military children benefiting the military community at large and further contributing to our culture.”